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Author Archives: Sarah Bailey

The problem of glare: A mismatch of lamp and location may be the real problem

The problem of glare: A mismatch of lamp and location may be the real problem

Concern about glare could be preventing specifiers and other users from choosing LEDs for certain applications. The problem of glare is one of design, however, not the result of an inherent weakness in LEDs themselves. Properly designed LED bulbs can produce a uniformly bright and pleasing light that is all but indistinguishable from popular but less efficient halogen bulbs.

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Design Lighting Consortium (DLC) – Who are they and what do they do?

Design Lighting Consortium (DLC) – Who are they and what do they do?

Like many governments around the world, the governments in the United States and Canada are mandating a reduction in energy consumption for commercial businesses. One way businesses can comply with this mandate is to take advantage of new lighting technologies that are more energy efficient, such as LEDs. As an incentive, utility companies offer rebates for switching from high wattage lighting, like incandescent and halogen, to low wattage lighting, like LEDs. Unfortunately, with all the different utility and efficiency programs—each with its own standards and rebate opportunities—rebates can be complex and confusing.

Enter the Design Lighting Consortium (DLC).

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The Swiss Army Knife of LED street lights: is this really the future?

The Swiss Army Knife of LED street lights: is this really the future?

Whether it’s Canadian writer and artist Douglas Coupland’s V-Pole or Philips and Ericsson’s Zero Site street light, the street lighting landscape is undergoing a major change. Yes, the number of urban areas investing in LED street lighting is increasing annually, but no longer are innovators, lighting manufacturers, or urban planners looking at LED street lighting just in terms of energy-efficiency. New proposals and designs are being unveiled to build more efficient urban infrastructures.

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Will local businesses accept the challenge to reduce energy consumption?

Will local businesses accept the challenge to reduce energy consumption?

Leapfrog Lighting is challenging local Ottawa retail stores to reduce their energy consumption by switching to LED lighting. To help with the initiative, we are holding a sweepstakes that offers one Ottawa-based retail store the chance to win $1000 in Leapfrog Lighting ENERGY STAR PAR30 3000K LED light bulbs (retail value $37.00 USD). The sweepstakes runs between March 15, 2014 and April 15, 2014.

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NOTE: If you need more LED light bulbs to round off your store, Ottawa Hydro provides a substantial discount–approximately 50%–for switching to our ENERGY STAR PAR30.

For full details and to enter, see the Community LEaDer Sweepstakes.

 

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Edge-to-Epic [article]: The Business Case for LED Lighting

Edge-to-Epic [article]: The Business Case for LED Lighting

CEO of Edge-to-Epic, Joelle Parenteau, discusses the business case for LED lighting:

“Here’s one we overlooked: LED lighting. Despite being the type of person who’s mood is very much affected by ‘brightness’, I never really stopped to consider my lightbulbs. That is until I met the wonderful team at Leapfrog who kindly offered me a beautifully boxed LED. Not too sure what to expect as I screwed it into a kitchen socket to test it out I must admit I was turned from skeptic to believe in a flash. Suddenly my kitchen looked like a million bucks…”[read more]

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Lighting Tradeshows in the United States and Canada – 2014

Lighting Tradeshows in the United States and Canada – 2014

It’s that time of year again when folks in the lighting industry start investigating and registering for various lighting conferences and tradeshows. While the goals of attending conferences vary, they are a great way to:

  • stay on top of the latest industry news and trends (with some conferences offering certificate courses)
  • learn of new innovative and cutting-edge lighting technologies
  • network with like-minded individuals; and, if you are a manufacturer
  • showcase your own lighting products.

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Understanding the label on the LED light bulb box: Color Quality, Power Factor, and Light Appearance

Understanding the label on the LED light bulb box: Color Quality, Power Factor, and Light Appearance

Confused about buying new light bulbs now that many of the old tried and true (and inexpensive) incandescents are banned? If so, you are not alone.

Last week, we explained how to locate—and understand—the light output of an LED lamp, as identified on the mandatory FTC label of the light bulb box. As you probably noticed when looking at all the new light bulbs on the store shelves, the traditionally used label, “Watts”, is no longer used to identify brightness, as it cannot adequately identify light output for new energy-efficient lamps. If you missed that blog, you can read it here: How to replace your phased-out (banned) light bulb with LED light bulbs: Understanding the label on the box.

“Brightness”, however, isn’t the only non-traditional term used on the FTC label of these new energy-efficient light bulbs: Color quality (measured by the Color Rendering Index), Power Factor (measured by a dimensionless number between -1 and 1, but often displayed as a percent), and Light Appearance (measured in degrees Kelvin) are used as well. So this week, we’ll take a closer look at each of these non-traditional light bulb descriptors.

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How to replace your phased-out (banned) light bulb with LED light bulbs: Understanding the label on the box

How to replace your phased-out (banned) light bulb with LED light bulbs: Understanding the label on the box

With inefficient light bulb bans currently in effect in both the United States and Canada (see The light bulb phase out: USA vs. Canada. Who’s winning? for more information), consumers and businesses alike are scrambling to find suitable replacements. Many mainstream media outlets identify the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulb as a viable alternative while in the same breath allude to the technology’s reliance on mercury—a powerful neurotoxin labeled a hazardous waste—to operate. However, Light-Emitting-Diode (LED) technology yields a much more capable light bulb, but public knowledge of LED lighting is still very limited. Has the length of time on market and technology familiarity weighed against LEDs as the replacement technology for banned bulbs? Today, we’d like to clear up some of the mysteries of LED lighting—such as the unfamiliar terms and numbers on the box.

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